Good Ol’ Texas Biscuits – Best in DFW 2018

Good day folks,

Little Red Wasp “Chicken and Biscuit”

One of my favorite things in this world is eating biscuits. Any type of biscuits, in any dish, in any form! I’ve been pondering on the idea of writing a story on biscuits because they are so delicious. After TWO whole years of research, I finally decided to let all my fellow foodies know where the best biscuits are located. I waited for TWO years because new eateries kept opening. Here we go everyone hop on the biscuit train!

Dictionary.com defines biscuits as…Any of various hard or crisp dry baked products: such as
(1) British : cracker (2) British : cookie
b : a small quick bread made from dough that has been rolled out and cut or dropped from a spoon. They’re just so much more than this.

When I read this, I laughed and thought we need to have a good ol’ Texas version of a definition for what biscuit means. So here it is…

Trey’s Chow Down defines biscuit as: a delicious lil flour-based treat cooked until golden brown perfection. It is fluffy, flaky, soft and should be covered with gravy or slathered in butter and jelly. It can be used for a sandwich, breakfast, or brunch treat.

I’ve been looking all over DFW for the best of the best biscuits. I’ve found some really delicious ones along with spreads to top them with. I hope you enjoy these lil bites of goodness as much as I enjoyed eating them. Head over to any of these places and let me know what you think! Be sure and tell ’em who sent you!

Grilled Cheese Heaven In TEXAS!

GOOD DAY CHOW HOUNDS,

The History of the Grilled Cheese Sandwich, posted by “How Stuff Works”, will tell you some three-quarters of people who buy sliced cheese make at least one grilled cheese a month. Similar grilled cheese recipes are even mentioned Ancient Roman texts—and, let’s face it, the French have been making their famous croquet-monsieurs since the early 1900s. TODAY’S common notion of the grilled cheese is traced back to the 1920s. During this time, an Iowa man now considered “the father of sliced bread”, invented a bread slicer that made distributing white bread easy and affordable. Shortly before that, James L. Kraft had patented processed cheese — you recognize the name, of course! Kraft’s entrepreneurship pursuit revolutionized the pasteurizing process and ensured that cheese wouldn’t spoil, even when transported long distances. By 1914, J.L. Kraft & Bros. Company (the precursor to Kraft Foods) opened its first plant in Illinois. Factory cheese was disparagingly termed “rattrap cheese” or “rat cheese” by the fiercely proud English folks who were proud of their cheddars. It was not considered a delicacy. To them, it was simply a cheap, nutritious, and scalable product.